JACK GOLDSTEIN x 10,000

May 10 - September 29, 2013

The first American retrospective of the Canadian-born artist Jack Goldstein (1945 – 2003) brings to light his important legacy. This comprehensive exhibition frames Goldstein as a central figure of the Pictures Generation of the 1970s and 1980s.

Installation view of the exhibition JACK GOLDSTEIN x 10,000 at the Jewish Museum, New York.  Photo: Bradford Robotham.

The first American retrospective of the Canadian-born artist Jack Goldstein (1945 – 2003) brings to light his important legacy. This comprehensive exhibition frames Goldstein as a central figure of the Pictures Generation of the 1970s and 1980s and showcases his influential paintings and films, while also including installations, writings, and pioneering sound recordings. The artists of the Pictures Generation, such as Cindy Sherman, Sherrie Levine, Laurie Simmons, Barbara Kruger, David Salle and Robert Longo, explored a new stylistic vocabulary grounded in their interest in popular culture, appropriating images from books, magazines, advertisements, television, and film.

Goldstein transformed, restaged, and remade films in such a way as to strip out specific details, context, and function. Exhibition highlights include his celebrated film of a growling Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer lion. Another signature work is the film The Jump featuring a leaping diver, performing a somersault and disintegrating into fragments. Given Goldstein’s legacy and his increasing relevance to younger artists, this long overdue retrospective is essential to a larger re-evaluation of post-1960s American art.

In conjunction with the exhibition, Jack Goldstein’s film The Jump (1978) was screened from 11:57–midnight for the month of August as the Times Square Arts’ Midnight Moment.

JACK GOLDSTEIN x 10,000 was organized by the Orange County Museum of Art and curated by guest curator Philipp Kaiser.

The Jewish Museum presentation has been organized by Joanna Montoya, Neubauer Family Foundation Assistant Curator.

The exhibition is made possible by a grant from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.
Additional support is provided by Jean and Tim Weiss, the National Endowment for the Arts, Barbara and Victor L. Klein, and Karyn D. Kohl.
The Jewish Museum presentation is made possible by the Melva Bucksbaum Fund for Contemporary Art. Generous support is also provided by Venus Over Manhattan.

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