The Changing Face of Family: Photographs from the Collection of the Jewish Museum

October 17, 1999 - February 6, 2000

This exhibition assembles images of the Jewish family from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present which reflect the constant tension between change and permanence.

This exhibition assembles images of the Jewish family from the second half of the nineteenth century to the present. Its chronological breadth reveals a significant theme: time. The passage of time is reflected in pictures of multiple generations, changing culture and relationships, and acts of remembrance. An early daguerreotype captures three generations of a single family. Richard Avedon creates a loving series dedicated to his dying father. Arnold Eagle attempts to preserve Jewish domestic rituals from assimilation in 1930s New York, while Lauren Greenfield documents a contemporary version of the Bar and Bat Mitzvah celebration in Los Angeles and Beverly Hills. Albert Winn and Lorie Novak address their past, complicated family relationships, and identity by incorporating snapshots into their work. Through ritual, remembrance, and relationships, the photographs presented here reflect the tension between change and permanence that characterizes both family life and photography.