The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography, Early Soviet Film

September 25, 2015 - February 7, 2016

From early vanguard constructivist works by Alexander Rodchenko and El Lissitzky, to the modernist images of Arkady Shaikhet and Max Penson, Soviet photographers played a pivotal role in the history of photography. Covering the period from the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution through the 1930s, this exhibition explores how early modernist photography influenced a new Soviet style while energizing and expanding the nature of the medium — and how photography, film, and poster art were later harnessed to disseminate Communist ideology. The Power of Pictures revisits this moment in history when artists acted as engines of social change and radical political engagement, so that art and politics went hand in hand. 

Installation view of the exhibition The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography, Early Soviet Film. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

Installation view of the exhibition The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography, Early Soviet Film. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

Installation view of the exhibition The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography, Early Soviet Film. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

Installation view of the exhibition The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography, Early Soviet Film. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

In a country where 70% of the population was illiterate, photographic propaganda often was more valuable than newspaper editorials. Lenin himself declared that the camera, as much as the gun, was an important weapon in “class struggle.” Recognizing that images had the power to transform society, Lenin put photography at the service of the Revolution — thereby serving as a historical demonstration of how artistic and political ambitions can coalesce and fortify one another. The Power of Pictures will illustrate that this work encompassed a much wider range of artistic styles and thematic content than previously recognized.

The exhibition makes clear that the artists who comprised the group Oktober, led by Alexander Rodchenko and Boris Ignatovich, and the photojournalists associated with the Russian Association of Proletarian Photographers (ROPF), such as Arkady Shaikhet and Georgi Zelma, were significantly influenced by avant-garde esthetics and by film in particular. The goal of Oktober was to create images that would force the viewer to see society in a new way, whereas ROPF — which included the majority of prominent Jewish photojournalists — championed a coherent and comprehensive documentation of reality.

In an intimate screening room within the exhibition galleries, films by major directors of the era, including the seminal Sergei Eisenstein film Battleship Potemkin, will be shown. Despite Eisenstein's relative fame, many of these filmmakers have been overlooked or excised from the history of the medium. More than a dozen films will be screened in their entirety on daily rotations throughout the run of the exhibition.

In addition to a stunning collection of photographic and cinematic works, The Power of Pictures features a rich array of film posters and vintage books that employ radical graphic styles with extreme color, dynamic geometric designs, and innovative collages and photomontages. Also presented are examples of periodicals in which major photographic works were published.

 

Photographers: 
Boris lgnatovich
Elizaveta lgnatovich
Olga lgnatovich
Yakov Khalip
Eleazar Langman
El Lissitzky
Moisei Nappelbaum
Max Penson
Georgy Petrusov
Alexander Rodchenko
Arkady Shaikhet
Georgy Zelma
Georgy Zimin


Filmmakers: 
Boris Barnet
Sergei Eisenstein
Mikhail Kalatozov
Grigory Kozintsev
Lev Kuleshov
Yakov Pratazanov
Vsevold Pudovkin
Esfir Shub
Victor Turin
Dziga Vertov

 


Susan Tumarkin Goodman
Senior Curator Emerita

Jens Hoffmann
Deputy Director, Exhibitions and Public Programs

#JMPowerOfPictures

The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography, Early Soviet Film  is made possible by the Eugene and Emily Grant Family Foundation, The David Berg Foundation, Andrew and Marina Lewin Foundation, the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, and the Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Exhibition Fund.
The catalogue is supported with endowment funds from the Dorot Foundation.


Special thanks to: Likhachev Foundation, St. Petersburg, Russia; Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, New York

 

Film Screenings: Daily Schedule
Click Here for Film Descriptions

Mondays and Fridays
11:15 am: Mother (89m)
12:45 pm: Salt for Svanetia (55m)
1:45 pm: October (103m)
3:30 pm: Storm Over Asia (125m)*

*Due to Sabbath observance, on Fridays after October 16 there is no 3:30 pm screening.

Tuesdays and Saturdays
11:15 am: The Fall of the Romanov Dynasty (87m)
1:00 pm: Turksib (57m)
2:00 pm: Man with a Movie Camera (68m)
3:30 pm: Aelita: Queen of Mars (111m)

Wednesdays (closed)

Thursdays* and Sundays
11:15 am: By the Law (83m)
1:00 pm: Battleship Potemkin (71m)
2:30 pm: The House on Trubnaya (64m)
4:00 pm: The Overcoat (66m)

*The entire film slate will rotate on Thursday evenings throughout the duration of the exhibition. For a full schedule, please visit the film calendar here.

Power of Pictures - The Films

12 groundbreaking films, shown on a rotating schedule, demonstrate how Soviet filmmakers understood the power of the screen and the moving image as few others have done. Included are Sergei Eisenstein’s Battleship Potemkin, and Dziga Vertov’ s Man With a Movie Camera, as well as works by lesser known filmmakers such as Grigory Kozintsev and Yakov Protazanov, who have been previously overlooked or excised from the history of the medium.

Touring

For more information regarding touring exhibitions, please contact Jennifer Ayres, Exhibitions Manager, at jayres@thejm.org.

In the Shop

The Power of Pictures Catalogue

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“Man with a Movie Camera” Russian Film Poster

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“Symphony of a Great City” Russian Film Poster

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Vintage Camera Pencil Sharpener

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