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  • Friday 11 am – 4 pm
  • Saturday 11 am – 5:45 pm

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The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York, NY 10128
212.423.3200

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Jewish Museum Members and visitors can park at Impark and Champion Parking. Read More

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Upcoming Events

Mon, Feb 18

Monday, February 18, 2019

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1 PM

Vacation Week Art Workshop
Imaginary Dioramas

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Mon, Feb 18

Monday, February 18, 2019

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3 PM

Archaeology Mondays

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Tue, Feb 19

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

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1 PM

Vacation Week Art Workshop
Imaginary Dioramas

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Wed, Feb 20

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

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1 PM

Vacation Week Art Workshop
Imaginary Dioramas - Cancelled

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Wed, Feb 20

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

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6:30 PM

The 33rd Annual Purim Ball

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Wed, Feb 20

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

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9:30 PM

The Purim Ball After Party

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Thu, Feb 21

Thursday, February 21, 2019

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1 PM

Vacation Week Art Workshop
Imaginary Dioramas

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Thu, Feb 21

Thursday, February 21, 2019

|

5:30 PM

Adult Studio Workshop
Screen Printing with Purpose

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Thu, Feb 21

Thursday, February 21, 2019

|

7 PM

The Art of Understanding
Unpacking the Book: Jewish Writers in Conversation

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Who We Are

Welcome to the Jewish Museum, a museum in New York City at the intersection of art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds. Whether you visit our home in the elegant Warburg mansion on Museum Mile, or engage with us online, there is something for everyone. Through our exhibitions, programs, and collection of nearly 30,000 works of art, ceremonial objects, and media, visitors can journey through 4,000 years of art and Jewish culture from around the world.


Our Mission

The Jewish Museum is dedicated to the enjoyment, understanding, and preservation of the artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people through its unparalleled collections and distinguished exhibitions. Learn More

History

The Jewish Museum was founded in 1904 in the library of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where it was housed for more than four decades. Located along New York's Museum Mile, this elegant former residence has been the home of the Museum since 1947. Learn More

Stories

Kehinde Wiley on Alios Itzhak Read More

On the occasion of Black History Month, listen to artist Kehinde Wiley describe his portrait of a young Ethiopian Jewish man on view now in Scenes from the Collection at the Jewish Museum.

Kehinde Wiley, Alios Itzhak (The World Stage: Israel), 2011. Oil and enamel on canvas. 115 x 80 x ⅛ in. (292.1 x 203.2 x 0.4 cm). The Jewish Museum, New York

“My obsession and passion is within the field of Western European easel painting,” says American artist Kehinde Wiley. For his global project The World Stage, Wiley traveled the world to insert people of color into the Western tradition of portraiture, echoing the classic poses of noblemen and leaders in commissioned portraits.

First exhibited at the Jewish Museum for the artist’s solo exhibition in 2012, his series The World Stage: Israel features a suite of vibrant, large-scale portraits of young Israeli men from diverse backgrounds — Ethiopian Israeli Jews, native-born Israeli Jews, and Muslim Arab Israelis. Each canvas is embedded with a unique pattern influenced by Jewish ritual objects.

On view now in Scenes from the Collection, Alios Itzhak, a portrait of a young man of Ethiopian origin, stands proudly before a background inspired by a cut-out nineteenth-century Ukrainian mizrah, also part of the Jewish Museum collection. With The World Stage, Wiley both globalizes the tradition of portraiture, and claims a prominent space within it for people of color.

Listen to Kehinde Wiley describe his portrait of Alios Itzhak:

https://medium.com/media/c4f8fece678c991b9a57eb0a48fcdbc8/href
Artist Kehinde Wiley with his portrait Alios Itzhak (The World Stage: Israel) in Scenes from the Collection at the Jewish Museum
Alios Itzhak comes from a series of paintings called “The World Stage.” In “The World Stage,” I travel globally to stop young people in the streets and asked them to pose for me. In this particular case, I went to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. I remember running into young Ethiopian Jews and young emcees who wanted to talk about contemporary life in Israel, but through the rubric of a very African-American form.
They created hip-hop music, they created art, they created their own statement about what it felt like to be alive in Israel in the 21st century. I don’t think many knew that this would be a museum portrait as such — with the capital ‘M’ involved. I think that we were dealing with a type of self-presentation that was perceived as not necessarily under scrutiny. For those reasons, I think what we have here is a look into what it feels like to be young and vital in contemporary Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.
— Kehinde Wiley

See Kehinde Wiley’s Alios Itzhak (The World Stage: Israel) on view now in Scenes from the Collection at the Jewish Museum. Explore more works of art honoring Black History Month online at TheJewishMuseum.org/Collection.


Kehinde Wiley on Alios Itzhak was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

The Jewish Museum Remembers Jonas Mekas (1922–2019) Read More

Jonas Mekas at the opening for the Take Me (I’m Yours) at the Jewish Museum, 2016

We are deeply saddened to hear about the passing of poet, filmmaker, critic, curator, and community organizer Jonas Mekas. Born in Lithuania in 1922, Mekas fled the Nazi regime and settled in New York in 1949. He later became widely recognized as the preeminent maker and promoter of American avant-garde and expanded cinema.

His contributions were vast: Mekas made nearly 100 films and videos, as well as photographic series and works on paper, co-founded the venerable Anthology Film Archives, and in 1968 under Jewish Museum Director Karl Katz, Mekas hosted his “Avantgarde Film Series” of the Film-Makers’ Cinemateque on Tuesday nights in the Jewish Museum’s auditorium. For three years, Mekas was the Jewish Museum’s ad-hoc film curator, where he premiered and screened the work of the most celebrated practitioners in the history of avant-garde cinema including Tony Conrad, Storm de Hirsch, Peter Kubelka, Paul Sharits, Stan Vanderbeek, Stan Brakhage, Ken Jacobs, Joyce Wieland, Kenneth Anger, Marie Menken, as well as a selection of his own films.

Installation view of the exhibition Take Me (I’m Yours). September 16, 2016 — February 5, 2017. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: David Heald.

Mekas chronicled all aspects of daily life with his camera, including the opening of the Jewish Museum’s participatory group exhibition Take Me (I’m Yours) in 2016, where visitors were encouraged to touch and take home works of art in the exhibition. For his work in the exhibition, With thanks to Joseph Cornell and Rose Hobart (2016), visitors took home a three-inch strip of film inside of an envelope. Mekas achieved the richly tonal blue hue of the film strip by using a glass filter formerly used by the artist Joseph Cornell during the projection of his 1936 film Rose Hobart, which was composed of footage extracted from George Melford’s 1931 film, East of Borneo, starring Hobart, one of Cornell’s muses. The original filter is at Anthology Film Archives.

Mekas will be remembered for his visionary films about the beauty, sadness, and magic of being human.


The Jewish Museum Remembers Jonas Mekas (1922–2019) was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Looking at the Gay Rights Movement through Art Read More

50 years after the Stonewall uprising, the Jewish Museum joins the Stonewall 50 Consortium to present a series of programs commemorating the movement’s anniversary.

Ross Bleckner, Double Portrait (Gay Flag), 1993. Oil on canvas.

On June 28, 1969, one of the most impactful moments for the modern-day gay rights movement occurred — the Stonewall uprising. It began when nine police officers raided the Stonewall Inn, a popular New York City gay bar located on Christopher Street in Greenwich Village. To the officers’ surprise, the patrons who were regular attendees at the Inn resisted their arrest and fought back. It was in this moment that the infamous uprising began.

Whether due to more law enforcement arriving to arrest those at the scene, or supporters of the LGBTQ+ community, the riots incited the entire country. The six-day event erupted as one of the most important moments in gay civil rights history.

At the time, the Stonewall uprising unveiled the discrimination and violence directed towards the LGBTQ+ community in America during the 1960s, which then gave room to a broader public discourse concerning gay liberation. But it was even more than that. Its legacy also serves as a timeless catalyst for marginalized peoples to find their power to fight against injustice.

Installation view of the exhibition Scenes from the Collection. NY. Photo by: Jason Mandella

50 years after Stonewall, the Jewish Museum joins dozens of non-profit and cultural organizations as part of the Stonewall 50 Consortium, to pay tribute through a year of programming, while highlighting works of art from the Jewish Museum collection that explore themes of gender and identity.

On view now in Scenes from the Collection some of these works include: Gert Wollheim’s portrait of a gender ambiguous couple in Weimar Germany; Ross Bleckner’s abstract painting that explores his gay and Jewish identity; and a series of paintings by Chantal Joffe depicting gay Jewish women of the 20th century, such as Claude Cahun, Gertrude Stein, and Susan Sontag.

Chantal Joffe, Susan Sontag, 2014. Part of the series “Hannah, Gertrude, Alice, Betty, Nadine, Golda, Susan, Claude, Nancy, Grace, Diane…” Oil on board.

Stonewall 50 Programs at the Jewish Museum

  • On Thursday, January 17, Eric Marcus, Stonewall 50 Consortium founder and creator of the award-winning podcast Making Gay History, will lead a workshop for educators exploring the history of the gay rights movement using a curriculum he has developed that includes excerpts from his podcast. His talk will be followed by visits to the Museum’s collection exhibition with museum educators to view art related to LGBTQ+ issues, and consider how art can deepen understanding and encourage communication about identity. Register online.
  • On Thursday, March 7, Stonewall 50 Consortium founder Eric Marcus will be joined in conversation with Jewish Museum collection artists Ross Bleckner and Deborah Kass to discuss their work in the context of LGBTQ+ history and Jewish identity. RSVP online.
  • On Thursday, May 30, community organizer and writer Adam Eli will lead a gallery walk-through of some of this favorite works in Scenes from the Collection, addressing queer themes and Jewish identity. RSVP online.
  • Every Tuesday in March, the Jewish Museum invites high school Gender and Sexuality Alliance Clubs to participate in discussions and art making events exploring representation of gender identity, social conventions, and historical activism. Visits for this program are first-come, first-served for individual students, as well as GSA clubs, who are encouraged to register as a group. For more information, contact teenprograms@thejm.org.

As an art museum representing the diversity of Jewish culture and identity, the Jewish Museum believes in free expression and an open society. We embrace multiple viewpoints regardless of race, gender, national origin, or religion, and we oppose discrimination in all its forms. As we mark 50 years since Stonewall, the Jewish Museum’s exhibitions and programs will continue provide platforms for cross-cultural dialogue, fostering empathy, mutual understanding, and respect. We champion the powerful roles art and artists can play in our communities, both inside and outside the Museum’s walls.

— Ali Sementilli, Education Intern

To learn more about works of works of art exploring LGBTQ+ themes in the Jewish Museum collection, visit TheJewishMuseum.org/Collection.


Looking at the Gay Rights Movement through Art was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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