The Jewish Museum is open today from 11 am - 5:45 pm.

Hours: Galleries

View All Hours
  • Sunday 11 am – 5:45 pm
  • Monday 11 am – 5:45 pm
  • Tuesday 11 am – 5:45 pm
  • Wednesday Closed
  • Thursday 11 am – 8 pm
  • Friday 11 am – 4 pm
  • Saturday 11 am – 5:45 pm

Ticket Pricing

View All
  • Adults $18
  • Seniors, 65 and over $12
  • Students $8
  • Children, 18 and under Free
  • Members Free
  • Thursdays, 5 – 8 pm Pay-What-You-Wish
  • Saturdays Free

The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York, NY 10128
212.423.3200

info@thejm.org
Open in Google Maps

Find directions by:

Transit Walk Car

Parking & Validation

Jewish Museum Members and visitors can park at Impark and Champion Parking. Read More

Tickets are validated through the Jewish Museum Security.

Upcoming Events

Sat, Nov 24

Saturday, November 24, 2018

|

11 AM

Free Saturdays

Learn More

Sun, Nov 25

Sunday, November 25, 2018

|

1 PM

Studio Art Sessions
Formal Construction

Learn More

Wed, Nov 28

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

|

2 PM

Verbal Description Tour
For Visitors Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision

Learn More

Thu, Nov 29

Thursday, November 29, 2018

|

5:30 PM

ASL Tour
For Visitors Who Are Deaf

Learn More

Thu, Nov 29

Thursday, November 29, 2018

|

6:30 PM

Writers & Artists Respond
Paul D’Agostino

Learn More

Fri, Nov 30

Friday, November 30, 2018

|

2 PM

Gallery Talk
Conceptual Art and the Sacred

Learn More

Sat, Dec 1

Saturday, December 1, 2018

|

11 AM

Free Saturdays

Learn More

Sun, Dec 2

Sunday, December 2, 2018

|

11 AM

Hanukkah Family Day
Art, Music, and More

Learn More

Mon, Dec 3

Monday, December 3, 2018

|

10:30 AM

Movies that Matter
Film Screenings for Schools

Learn More

Who We Are

Welcome to the Jewish Museum, a museum in New York City at the intersection of art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds. Whether you visit our home in the elegant Warburg mansion on Museum Mile, or engage with us online, there is something for everyone. Through our exhibitions, programs, and collection of nearly 30,000 works of art, ceremonial objects, and media, visitors can journey through 4,000 years of art and Jewish culture from around the world.


Our Mission

The Jewish Museum is dedicated to the enjoyment, understanding, and preservation of the artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people through its unparalleled collections and distinguished exhibitions. Learn More

History

The Jewish Museum was founded in 1904 in the library of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where it was housed for more than four decades. Located along New York's Museum Mile, this elegant former residence has been the home of the Museum since 1947. Learn More

Stories

Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything Coming to... Read More

Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything — Coming to the Jewish Museum

Opening in April 2019, the Jewish Museum in New York presents a contemporary art exhibition inspired by the life and work of novelist, poet, and singer/songwriter Leonard Cohen.

https://medium.com/media/ee9c0556ceb1f14c1d441c1de15b525b/href

Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack, a crack in everything
That’s how the light gets in.

 — Leonard Cohen

A world-renowned novelist, poet, and singer/songwriter who inspired generations of writers, musicians, and artists, Leonard Cohen (1934–2016) was an extraordinary poet of the imperfection of the human condition, giving voice to what it means to be fully alert to the complexities and desires of both body and soul. For decades, he tenaciously supplied the world with melancholy and urgent observations on the state of the human heart, in songs such as “Suzanne,” “Bird on a Wire,” and “Hallelujah.” With equal parts gravitas and grace, Cohen teased out a startlingly inventive and singular language, depicting both an exalted spirituality and an earthly sexuality. His interweaving of the sacred and the profane, of mystery and accessibility, was such a compelling combination it became seared into memory.

Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything, opening at the Jewish Museum in April 2019, is the first exhibition entirely devoted to the imagination and legacy of the influential singer/songwriter, man of letters, and global icon from Montréal, Canada. The exhibition includes commissioned works by a range of international artists who have been inspired by Cohen’s style and recurring themes in his work, a video projection showcasing Cohen’s own drawings, and an innovative multimedia gallery where visitors can hear covers of Cohen’s songs by musicians such as Lou Doillon; Feist; Moby; and The National with Sufjan Stevens, Ragnar Kjartansson, and Richard Reed Parry, among others.

Participating Artists

Kara Blake
Candice Breitz
Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller
Christophe Chassol
Daily Tous Les Jours
Tacita Dean
Kota Ezawa
George Fok
Ari Folman
Jon Rafman
Taryn Simon

Courtesy of Old Ideas, LLC

Organized by the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (MAC), the exhibition is curated by John Zeppetelli, Director and Chief Curator at the MAC, and Victor Shiffman, Guest Curator. The New York presentation is coordinated for the Jewish Museum by Kelly Taxter, Barnett and Annalee Newman Curator of Contemporary Art, and Ruth Beech, Senior Deputy Director, Programs & Strategic Initiatives.

Following its New York showing, the exhibition will tour to Kunstforeningen GL STRAND and Nikolaj Kunsthal, Copenhagen, Denmark (October 23, 2019 — February 16, 2020) and the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco (September 17, 2020 — January 3, 2021).

Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything is on view at the Jewish Museum in New York, April 12 — September 8, 2019. To learn more, visit TheJewishMuseum.org.


Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything Coming to the Jewish Museum was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

The Jewish Museum and New York Public Library... Read More

The Jewish Museum and New York Public Library Acquire Maira Kalman’s “The Elements of Style”

Maira Kalman, The Elements of Style, “Hot day. Book found. Aha! Words cannot express. If only I could. Without a doubt. Goodness. Good. Good. Good. Maira Kalman,“ 2004–17, gouache on paper. The Jewish Museum, New York and The New York Public Library. Purchase: Jewish Museum, Gift of The Kagan-Katz-Kivel Families, by exchange and Art Acquisitions Committee Fund; New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations; Louise and Leonard Riggio; Hillary Blumberg and Alex Ginsberg; Alice and Tom Tisch; Barbara Toll; anonymous donors; May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc; Ellen and Robert Grimes; and partial gift of Julie Saul Gallery, 2018–76.1–57

The Jewish Museum and The New York Public Library (NYPL) have jointly acquired the complete series of 57 gouaches on paper created by designer, author, illustrator, and artist Maira Kalman for the 2005 edition of The Elements of Style.

Maira Kalman, “The Elements of Style Illustrated,” 2017, gouache on paper. The Jewish Museum, New York and The New York Public Library. Purchase: Jewish Museum, Gift of The Kagan-Katz-Kivel Families, by exchange and Art Acquisitions Committee Fund; New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations; Louise and Leonard Riggio; Hillary Blumberg and Alex Ginsberg; Alice and Tom Tisch; Barbara Toll; anonymous donors; May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc; Ellen and Robert Grimes; and partial gift of Julie Saul Gallery, 2018–76.1–57

In The Elements of Style Maira Kalman adapts the well-known reference book of the same name by William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White (originally published by Strunk in 1918, and revised by White in 1959), pairing her irreverent illustrations with its grammatical rules. Known to generations of aspiring writers and English students, Kalman discovered the book at a used bookstore around 2002. She found it so amusing and subject to visual interpretation that it became her most beloved project to date.

Claudia Gould, Helen Goldsmith Menschel Director, The Jewish Museum, said:

“Even before participating in the organization of Maira Kalman’s 2011 retrospective, I greatly admired her perceptive, irreverent work. This is the first time that the Jewish Museum has collaborated with another institution on a major acquisition. The joint acquisition with The New York Public Library of Kalman’s paintings for The Elements of Style allows us to significantly expand our holdings of Kalman’s work with this witty, incisive series by a unique illustrator, artist, and author.”

“Maira Kalman’s whimsical interpretation of The Elements of Style breathed new life into an important book, making it increasingly attainable while capturing the playful spirit of the original authors,” said New York Public Library President Tony Marx. “We are so proud to partner with The Jewish Museum to acquire the 50-plus paintings from this significant contemporary work, which exemplifies the very nature of what happens in our research libraries every day: primary sources being used to create new works. We look forward to seeing how researchers utilize the Kalman pieces, perhaps to make their own interpretations.”

Maira Kalman, The Elements of Style, “Polly loves cake more than she loves me,” 2004–2017, gouache on paper. The Jewish Museum, New York and The New York Public Library. Purchase: Jewish Museum, Gift of The Kagan-Katz-Kivel Families, by exchange and Art Acquisitions Committee Fund; New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations; Louise and Leonard Riggio; Hillary Blumberg and Alex Ginsberg; Alice and Tom Tisch; Barbara Toll; anonymous donors; May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc; Ellen and Robert Grimes; and partial gift of Julie Saul Gallery, 2018–76.1–57.

Maira Kalman observed,

“Since I am Jewish and since I adore libraries, isn’t it thrilling that these two glorious institutions share the work. I make books. And I make art. The works are the intersection of these, mixed with a great dollop of curiosity. In a kind of Talmudic manner, I think E.B. White would be pleased. Doesn’t it all make complete wonderful sense!”

Of Kalman’s paintings for The Elements of Style, there are various complex and almost always humorous relationships to the text. In one painting, Kalman depicts a romantic couple seated outdoors with the female looking longingly away from her man to illustrate the text about comparative pronouns, “Polly loves cake more than she loves me.” In another, a guilty expression accompanies a basset hound in the caption of parenthetic phrases, “Well, Susan, this is a fine mess you are in.”

Maira Kalman, The Elements of Style, “Well, Susan, this is a fine mess you are in.” 2004–2017, gouache on paper. The Jewish Museum, New York and The New York Public Library. Purchase: Jewish Museum, Gift of The Kagan-Katz-Kivel Families, by exchange and Art Acquisitions Committee Fund; New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations; Louise and Leonard Riggio; Hillary Blumberg and Alex Ginsberg; Alice and Tom Tisch; Barbara Toll; anonymous donors; May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc; Ellen and Robert Grimes; and partial gift of Julie Saul Gallery, 2018–76.1–57.

In 2017, the Julie Saul Gallery showed the entire series of illustrations for the first time. Although the artist has sold other works from previous collections to individual collectors, Kalman chose to keep the illustrations for The Elements of Style as one body of work. At the time of publication it also became an original opera written by the young prodigy Nico Muhly in collaboration with Kalman, commissioned by the Library. It was performed in the Rose Main Reading Room at the iconic branch on 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue in October 2005 and subsequently at Lincoln Center and the Dia Foundation in Beacon, NY.

In 2011, the Jewish Museum exhibited Maira Kalman: Various Illuminations (of a Crazy World), a retrospective of Kalman’s work organized by the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia. In addition to The Elements of Style series, the Jewish Museum’s collection includes six works on paper by Kalman and in 2014, the Museum commissioned Kalman to create a mural, In This Life, There Was Very Much (2015), for its restaurant, Russ & Daughters at the Jewish Museum.

The Library named Kalman a Library Lion in 2015, awarded for her contributions to New York City and the creative community at large. In honor of the event celebrating her accomplishments and those of her fellow honorees, Kalman selected an illustration from The Elements of Style series for a public display. She is also currently working on illustrations for a book about libraries to be published in partnership with Macmillan and the Library.

About Maira Kalman

Maira Kalman (Israeli, b. 1949) was born in Tel Aviv and moved to New York with her family at the age of four. She was raised in bucolic Riverdale, the Bronx, and now lives in Manhattan. Kalman has written and illustrated 18 children’s books, including Ooh-la-la-Max in Love; What Pete Ate; Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey; 13 WORDS, a collaboration with Lemony Snicket; Why We Broke Up, with Daniel Handler; Looking at Lincoln; and Thomas Jefferson Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Everything. She is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker, and is well known for her collaboration with Rick Meyerowitz on the New Yorkistan cover published in 2001 and The New York City Sub-Culinary Map. Kalman is currently creating an illustrated column for The New Yorker based on travels to museums and libraries. Maira Kalman is represented by Julie Saul Gallery in New York City.

Maira Kalman, In This Life, There Was Very Much, 2015. Assemblage of vignettes and small scenes reflecting the artist’s appreciation of good food, shared human pleasure, and her view that Russ & Daughters represents a New York City infused with a sense of character, yearning, and humor. Commissioned by the Jewish Museum. Photo courtesy of Russ & Daughters.

On Wednesday, November 7, 10:30 am, join Maira Kalman and her son Alex Kalman for a conversation at Russ & Daughters the Jewish Museum about their new book, Sara Berman’s Closet, a dazzling illustrated family memoir inspired by the exhibition of the same name that first opened at Mmuseumm, traveled to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2017, and will move to the Skirball Center in Los Angeles this fall. Tickets include a sit-down breakfast at Russ & Daughters at the Jewish Museum and a copy of Sara Berman’s Closet.


The Jewish Museum and New York Public Library Announce Joint Acquisition of Maira Kalman’s “The… was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

OY/YO: An Icon Revisited Read More

Jewish Museum intern Ariel Fishman reflects on the Yiddish influences in OY/YO, a sculpture by Deborah Kass.

Installation view of Scenes from the Collection. The Jewish Museum, New York. Photo by: Kris Graves

When I walk onto the third floor of the Jewish Museum, my eye is immediately drawn to artist Deborah Kass’s bright yellow aluminum sculpture OY/YO. Recently acquired for the Jewish Museum collection, the work is now also on view in Scenes from the Collection, the Museum’s rotating exhibition that places contemporary art alongside ceremonial objects to explore Jewish identities past and present. First encountered as a work of public art in Brooklyn Bridge Park, the words OY/YO became an instant icon through its placement between two New York City boroughs: YO would welcome viewers to Brooklyn, while OY faced Manhattan. Later adapted as an edition for the Jewish Museum, the sculpture gains new meaning within the context of a dynamic collection spanning 4,000 years of art and Jewish culture.

Photo: Elisabeth Berstein

Since the 1980s, Kass’s practice has riffed on modern artworks by famous white men to assert her own experience as a Jewish woman artist. Inspired by Ed Ruscha’s 1962 painting OOF, Kass’s text-based sculpture draws connections to Yiddish, a language which struggles for its posterity. Despite its dissolution as a commonly used language among Jews, certain phrases (such as oy vey) have persisted, and become deeply embedded within mainstream American language.

Mel Bochner, The Joys of Yiddish, 2012. Oil and acrylic on canvas.

While my grandparents spoke fluent Yiddish, only a few phrases have seeped into my vocabulary, such as kvetcher or schvitzer. On a wall directly behind OY/YO in the exhibition gallery, Mel Bochner’s 2012 painting The Joys of Yiddish is filled with Yiddish phrases from Leo Rosten’s classic 1968 book The Joys of Yiddish in yellow paint against a black background. The yellow writing, evocative of the Star of David that Jews were required to wear during Nazi Germany, play off of the vibrant yellow in Kass’s sculpture.

I recall my dad telling me once, how embarrassed he would be when my grandmother spoke Yiddish with her friends in public. He described how Yiddish sounded so foreign and alien in an assimilated American society that had not encountered the language before. Yet I take those Yiddish phrases in Bochner’s painting for granted as an inherent part of my culture. Oy feels like such a modern sentiment, but it is also weighed by history.

I don’t recognize all the phrases in The Joys of Yiddish, but OY/YO complements their sentiment and creates a universal accessibility to Yiddish. In this context, the sculpture proudly asserts a Jewish narrative, while simultaneously pointing to universal experiences shared among people of all faiths and backgrounds: “yo” has become a casual greeting accompanied by a wave (in Spanish, “yo” also means “I), while “oy” has served as an easily grunted exclamatory phrase. Kass once said about her sculpture:

“The fact that this particular work resonates so beautifully in so many languages to so many communities is why I wanted to make it monumental.”
Installation view of Scenes from the Collection. The Jewish Museum, New York. Photo by: Kris Graves

It is impossible to only peripherally engage with Kass’s large, bright, and commanding sculpture. The words “oy” and “yo” are monumentalized in this way as icons: the aluminum suggests a sense of solidity and weight, that the words are heavier than we may think. By utilizing the visual language of Pop art, Kass also makes the joys of Yiddish accessible for a generation far removed from our Yiddish-speaking ancestors.

—Ariel Fishman, Communications Intern

See OY/YO by Deborah Kass and The Joys of Yiddish by Mel Bochner on view now in Scenes from the Collection.


OY/YO: An Icon Revisited was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Shop

Hagenauer Menorah

Shop Online

Sol LeWitt Kippah

Shop Online

Become a Member

Jewish Museum members help us achieve our mission and also receive great benefits, including early access to exhibitions, free admission, discounts, and more.

Join or Renew Today