The Jewish Museum is open today from 11 am - 8 pm.

Hours: Galleries

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  • Sunday10 am – 5:45 pm
  • Monday11 am – 5:45 pm
  • Tuesday11 am – 5:45 pm
  • WednesdayClosed
  • Thursday11 am – 8 pm
  • Friday11 am – 5:45 pm
  • Saturday10 am – 5:45 pm

Ticket Pricing

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  • Adults $18
  • Seniors, 65 and over $12
  • Students $8
  • Children, 18 and under Free
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  • Saturdays Free

The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York, NY 10128

The Jewish Museum
1109 5th Ave at 92nd St
New York, NY 10128
212.423.3200

info@thejm.org
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Parking & Validation

Jewish Museum Members and visitors can park at Impark and Champion Parking. Read More

Tickets are validated through the Jewish Museum Security.

Upcoming Events

Thu, May 23

Thursday, May 23, 2019

|

10 AM

Extended Gallery Hours for Members
Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything

Learn More

Thu, May 23

Thursday, May 23, 2019

|

8 PM

Concert
Meredith Monk and Vocal Ensemble Co-presented by Bang on a Can

Learn More

Fri, May 24

Friday, May 24, 2019

|

10 AM

Extended Gallery Hours for Members
Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything

Learn More

Tue, May 28

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

|

10 AM

Extended Gallery Hours for Members
Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything

Learn More

Wed, May 29

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

|

2 PM

Verbal Description Tour
For Visitors who are Blind or Have Low Vision

Learn More

Wed, May 29

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

|

6:30 PM

ASL Performance with Douglas Ridloff
For Visitors in the ASL Community

Learn More

Thu, May 30

Thursday, May 30, 2019

|

10 AM

Extended Gallery Hours for Members
Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything

Learn More

Thu, May 30

Thursday, May 30, 2019

|

6:30 PM

Writers and Artists Respond
Adam Eli

Learn More

Fri, May 31

Friday, May 31, 2019

|

10 AM

Extended Gallery Hours for Members
Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything

Learn More

Who We Are

Welcome to the Jewish Museum, a museum in New York City at the intersection of art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds. Whether you visit our home in the elegant Warburg mansion on Museum Mile, or engage with us online, there is something for everyone. Through our exhibitions, programs, and collection of nearly 30,000 works of art, ceremonial objects, and media, visitors can journey through 4,000 years of art and Jewish culture from around the world.


Our Mission

The Jewish Museum is dedicated to the enjoyment, understanding, and preservation of the artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people through its unparalleled collections and distinguished exhibitions. Learn More

History

The Jewish Museum was founded in 1904 in the library of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where it was housed for more than four decades. Located along New York's Museum Mile, this elegant former residence has been the home of the Museum since 1947. Learn More

Stories

The Jewish Museum Remembers Dr. Vivian B. Mann,... Read More

Dr. Vivian B. Mann at the opening reception for the Jewish Museum exhibition Morocco: Jews and Art in a Muslim Land, September 2000

The Jewish Museum mourns the loss of Dr. Vivian B. Mann, Curator Emerita, who passed away yesterday. Vivian served as the Morris and Eva Feld Chair of Judaica at the Jewish Museum (1979–2008), where she organized many notable exhibitions, including Gardens and Ghettos: The Art of Jewish Life in Italy; Convivencia: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain; and Morocco: Jews and Art in a Muslim Land. Vivian was also a Professor Emerita of Jewish Art and Visual Culture at The Jewish Theological Seminary. She was a preeminent scholar of Judaica, publishing and lecturing extensively throughout the world. Vivian’s memory will live on through her inspiring mentorship to staff at the Museum. Her legacy is profound, and we will continue to learn from her groundbreaking research and exhibitions.

We extend our condolences to her beloved family.


The Jewish Museum Remembers Dr. Vivian B. Mann, Curator Emerita was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

A Modern Take on the Seder Plate Read More

Before the Passover holiday, discover a modern take on a traditional ritual object on view now at the Jewish Museum

“If we design objects that look old, people will think the ceremonies are old.” — Moshe Zabari
Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert, Passover Set, 1930 Frankfurt, produced 1978. The Jewish Museum, New York

Passover begins at sundown this Friday, April 19 and celebrates the liberation of Jews from slavery in ancient Egypt, as told in the Book of Exodus. Occurring over eight days, this Jewish holiday is marked on the first night by the central observance of the Seder, a ritual meal with symbolic foods that represent important elements of the story.

In preparation for the Seder, listen to Jewish Museum collection artist Amy Klein Reichert and the Jewish Museum’s Senior Curator Emerita Susan Braunstein discuss this Passover set designed by Ludwig Yehuda Wolpert, celebrated as the first artist to apply the aesthetic principles of modernism to the making of Jewish ceremonial art:

https://medium.com/media/d703358b1b07ae66d9455fb9fe240102/href
AMY REICHERT:
My name is Amy Reichert. I am an architect, exhibit designer, and designer of Judaica, and we’re standing in front of a Seder plate by Ludwig Wolpert.
SUSAN BRAUNSTEIN:
Its streamlined appearance reflects the aesthetic principles of the avant-garde Bauhaus school in which Wolpert was trained. Yet, its function is traditional. Centerpieces like this one play an important role during the Seder, which is the ceremonial meal that Jews hold on the first and often second night of Passover.
AMY REICHERT:
The Passover celebration is really the core of Judaism in many ways, which is about being a stranger in a strange land, becoming enslaved, and then being redeemed. So it’s a story that really can resonate across the ages and is specific to the Jewish people, yet kind of expresses universal yearnings for freedom and the ability to take charge of one’s life.
The Seder plate itself is kind of the main stage prop that we’re called upon to use. It contains ritual foods that symbolize both slavery and freedom, bitter herbs which articulate the bitterness of slavery in Egypt, springtime green, which celebrate freedom. So we eat some of these, we point to them, we lift them, we really engage with the Seder plate to a large degree. It’s kind of the diva or the star of the show on the Seder table.
This Seder plate, even though it looks totally modern and really reminds me of nothing so much as a cocktail set from a 1920s screwball comedy, yet it fulfills perfectly the demands of what it’s supposed to hold, what it’s supposed to do. So in a very modern idiom it sort of fulfills all the traditional demands on it.

Ludwig Wolpert’s Passover Set is on view now in Scenes from the Collection at the Jewish Museum. Plan your visit during Passover Free Admission Days on April 20, 21, 26, and 27. Learn more about the holiday through more works in the collection online at TheJewishMuseum.org/Collection.


A Modern Take on the Seder Plate was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

The Art of Online Ticketing Read More

How the Jewish Museum redesigned the user experience of its online ticketing systems with a human-centered approach.

Screenshot of the Jewish Museum’s new general admission online ticketing site, where visitors can now purchase advance tickets to the upcoming exhibition Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything.

On your last visit to an art museum, did you notice its online ticketing system? While it’s usually the art that makes a lasting impression, a recent initiative at the Jewish Museum to improve the user experience of online transactions on TheJewishMuseum.org aimed to make the process of purchasing a ticket as enjoyable as a visit to the Museum itself.

Whether you are a first-time visitor, a long-time member, or an occasional program attendee, purchasing a ticket or membership on our website should be a seamless and easy-to-use experience. But that was not always the case.

For the last several years, the Jewish Museum has leveraged ACME as the technology which powers our ticketing and membership sales both on-site and online. The product was selected for its ability to integrate with Salesforce, the Museum’s customer relationship management (CRM) database, as well as its API (application programming interface), which would enable flexibility to later customize the system for our own needs.

Originally, our user-facing pages for ACME online ticketing looked like this:

Although fairly close to the Museum’s graphic identity and as an e-commerce platform, performed its basic functions, there were certain limitations to the white label product, which also prevented the launch of general admissions online ticketing—a necessity for the visitor experience in the year 2019. Working collaboratively with ACME as well as our web developers at Shift Labs, the Jewish Museum’s Digital team began an enduring, nearly year-long journey to completely redesign the user interfaces of all online user transactions. Today, we are now the first museum to successfully customize the look and feel of all ticketing and membership sales using the ACME API.

To achieve this, we used the same human-centered design approach as the rebuild of our online collection: research into desired functionality, prototyping solutions, gathering feedback, and making iterative changes.

Defining Success

The first step in defining success for the project was to identify and interview all the key stakeholders involved with ticketing and membership at the Jewish Museum. After interviewing staff across departments and gathering feedback, we knew that a successful redesign would have to meet the following criteria:

  • Transactions should be easy to use from a usability perspective
  • Conversions to sale can be tracked using Google Analytics
  • Enhanced data capture opportunities to enable email opt-ins
  • The Jewish Museum’s graphic identity must be applied
  • Unify the visual language and information architecture across all ACME transactions: General Admission, Box Office, Membership, Donations

Challenges

The main challenge of this redesign project was the daunting task of incorporating all the necessary requirements requested by internal stakeholders. Transactions sometimes also had different and overlapping stakeholders. Any successful design would have to include the requirements addressed by departments across the Museum, including Visitor Experience, Development, Membership, Marketing, and Digital. Lastly, these new forms would have to seamlessly incorporate into the existing website architecture.

Research

The design process began with research into best practices of web form design. Since one of the goals of this project was to make these transactions as easy as possible, we wanted to ensure optimal usability for any potential design solutions. We settled on this Nielsen Norman Group article as our guideline, which provides 10 recommendations for web form usability.

The next step in the research process was to conduct a competitive landscape review of other online ticketing systems. We looked at other museums, online retailers, and event management sites to garner a better understanding of how different industries are approaching the online checkout processes we are looking to redesign and improve while following best practices. The review allowed us to see what potential users were accustomed to experiencing, as well as provide inspiration for our own design solutions.

Very early design sketch

This research provided a foundation to begin experimenting with ideas using very rough sketches. We quickly narrowed down our ideas through this iterative sketching until we eventually were comfortable moving forward with a clear plan to unify the experience of the four transactions.

Paper Prototyping

The next step in the design process was to create paper prototypes for our designs of every transaction. Hand-drawn designs were created for each step within the transaction. Once created, we were able to review the prototypes with relevant stakeholders to ensure the following:

  • The designs abided by the Nielsen Norman Group guidelines
  • The designs accounted for every relevant data field
  • Stakeholders were satisfied with the overall design ideas

The benefit of this type of prototyping was the ability to quickly receive feedback and easily make adjustments to our design. After a few iterations, prototypes were finalized and we were confident to move forward.

Paper prototype for General Admission

Cognitive Walk-Through

Since one of the goals of this project was to make it as easy as possible for a user to complete each transaction, we wanted to evaluate the usability of each finalized paper prototype. We chose the cognitive walk-through as our evaluation method. The basic premise of the cognitive walk-through is to come up with a task (in our case a successfully completed transaction), define all the steps required to complete the task, and then ask these questions for each step:

  1. Will the user try to achieve the right effect?
  2. Will the user notice that the correct action is available?
  3. Will the user associate the correct action with the effect that the user is trying to achieve?
  4. If the correct action is performed, will the user see that progress is being made toward the solution of the task?

After completing a walk-through with each paper prototype, no major problems were identified and we were satisfied with the usability of our designs.

Interactive Prototypes

The next step in the process was to convert all of the paper prototype design interfaces into static digital wireframes using the Sketch design app. The wireframes for each transaction were then connected together to create four clickable, “interactive” prototypes using Marvel. Stakeholders were able to review these interactive prototypes one last time for approval before we began the development phase.

An interactive digital prototype of the Box Office flow using Marvel

The clickable prototypes and branding guidelines were provided to Shift Lab, the developers for this project. The prototypes were used as a reference point between the Museum, Shift Lab, and ACME to ensure that the ACME API was capturing the correct fields in our custom forms.

Launch

The project was a success and all four transactions (General Admissions, Box Office, Donations, and Membership) now have branded, simplified forms with a similar visual language and a consistent four-step process:

  • Select
  • Info
  • Payment
  • Visit

These new transaction pages, including online general admission ticketing, are now live, just in time for the launch of ticket sales for Leonard Cohen: A Crack in Everything, opening at the Jewish Museum on April 12, 2019.

We would like to thank the Jewish Museum’s Development, Visitor Experience, Marketing, Digital, and Membership staff as well as the web developers at Shift Labs and ACME for making this project come together.

— Carlos Acevedo, Digital Asset Manager, The Jewish Museum


The Art of Online Ticketing was originally published in The Jewish Museum on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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